Cio Aica Forum, Aused, Cio Club Italia, Fidainform, Cionet today present in Italy the •Ten Principles for managing fair and correct software licenses for cloud users • which

In this commitment Luciano Guglielmi, president of Cio Aica Forum, is spokesperson for all other national associations (about 3 thousand companies are represented, and this is the first time that happens.

♪ All these associations ♪ Guglielmi ♪ want to address the issue of unfair practices of software vendors, which inhibit free will to move on the cloud in a fair

The initiative is European. Cigref, the French Cio Association, carried out an awareness campaign on the subject on 14 April in France, under the patronage of the French Ministry for Digital Transformation. The same will be true in Belgium, the UK, Denmark and Spain in September.

Why is he now talking about the ten principles for managing software licenses that are fair and correct for cloud users? • Because the Digital Market Act has reached the Commission level in the European Parliament and it is necessary to amend it to stop unfair practices • explains Gugli When a company wants to adopt the cloud one of the first things it encounters are software licenses, which it already uses on premise and which to go to the cloud it has to buy back. A phenomenon that has been going on for at least three years and that works in the biunivocal sense. And if software manufacturer and cloud providers often match you have a double lock-in.

As the representative of Cispe Francisco Mingorance explained, the discussion of the amendments to the Digital Market Act will take place in the ITRE Commission of the European Parliament (the one, to be understood, which follows the economic, industrial and productive issues) in September In plenary session of the European Parliament, the text should arrive in 2022 with the French Presidency of the EU. But more than half of the principles are already included in the Dma.

What ten principles for software licensing are needed

Software plays a crucial role for all companies and licenses determine in detail how and where software can be used, and its cost.

In recent decades, some software providers have exploited their market position to limit their choice and impose unjustified technical, contractual or financial constraints on companies, the so-called lock-in vendor.

All associations involved in the drafting of the ten principles believe that the proposal contained in the Digital Markets Act (DMA) represents an opportunity to include some software publishers among the so-called gateways (i.e. online platforms that exercise a control function of access)

According to the proposers, the obligation of fair software licensing could quickly lead to a more open and competitive digital market in Europe.

For Luciano Guglielmi, President CIO AICA Forum, Member of the Board of EuroCIO › To be competitive on global markets you need to have the guarantee to play with equal weapons. Therefore we believe that the adoption of clear and unambiguous rules for all actors in the provision of cloud infrastructure services should be a priority and can be conducive to full use of potential, ensuring freedom of choice of the provider without barriers or constraints

Why the Ten Principles Need

As an increasing number of companies of any size, from startups to large institutions, are migrating to the cloud, it is essential that access to software, digital services and infrastructure is unlimited and competitive.

The cloud, in fact, is the basis for future innovations ranging from quantum computing to 6G, from artificial intelligence to virtual reality. But many are realizing how unfair licensing terms damage their ability to freely choose the most suitable cloud solution to meet their needs.

The prominence of some players in key software markets makes it virtually impossible to negotiate fair licences and many organisations report that they are unable to face strong companies with such a dominant position. In particular, SMEs suffer the greatest damage.

Commenting on the ten principles on behalf of Cispe, President Alban Schmutz, said that ›We have a historic opportunity to ensure that the proposed digital market law addresses the unfair practices of some legacy The ten principles are an important element in defining licensing software rules for businesses and consumers in the digital economy.

Read the editorial that Alban Schmutz wrote for 01net

The Ten Principles of Fair Licensing Software set out a series of voluntary obligations that support Europe’s digital transformation and promote a fair and competitive market for cloud-based services in Europe.

All parties, companies, software developers, vendors and service providers, wherever they operate, are encouraged to adopt and apply the Principles as the basis of a fair and cloud-friendly licensing. The European Commission and Member States are invited to consider the Principles to develop obligations for gateways in terms of the DMA proposal or other regulations.

The Ten Principles of Fair Software Licensing

The terms of the licence must be clear and understandable: the terms of the licence must always be written clearly, allow customers to promptly determine their licensing costs and allow customers to easily determine their obligations. Software providers must not charge or otherwise penalise customers for non-compliance with ambiguous, misleading or confused licensing terms. However, such terms of licence should be interpreted against the licensor and not used to take additional licensing costs from customers.

The terms of the licence must always be clearly written, allow customers to promptly determine their licensing costs and allow customers to easily determine their obligations. Software providers must not charge or otherwise penalise customers for non-compliance with ambiguous, misleading or confused licensing terms. However, such terms of licence should be interpreted against the licensor and not used to take additional licensing costs from customers. Freedom to bring previously purchased software into the cloud: Customers who wish to migrate their software from local to the cloud should not be required to purchase separate duplicate licenses for the same software. They should be free of licensing restrictions and increased costs that discriminate their ability to run licensed software in the cloud and on the cloud providers of their choice.

Customers who wish to migrate their software from local to the cloud should not be required to purchase separate duplicate licenses for the same software. They should be free of licensing restrictions and increased costs that discriminate their ability to run licensed software in the cloud and on the cloud providers of their choice. Customers should be free to run their local software on the cloud of their choice: licenses that allow customers to run software on their hardware (usually called…on-premise software) should also allow them to use that software on the cloud at the choice of the

licenses allowing customers to run software on their hardware (usually called…on-premises software) should also allow them to use that software on the cloud at the customer’s choice without further restrictions. Cost reduction through efficient hardware use: Software providers should not limit the execution of their customers’ workloads on secure cloud resources. Restrictive licensing terms requiring cloud customers to use a supplier’s software only on hardware dedicated exclusively to that customer deprive customers of efficiency and generate unnecessary costs that discourage cloud adoption.

Software providers should not limit the execution of their customers’ workloads on secure cloud resources. Restrictive licensing terms requiring cloud customers to use a supplier’s software only on hardware dedicated exclusively to that customer deprive customers of efficiency and generate unnecessary costs that discourage cloud adoption. Freedom from retaliation for cloud choices: Software providers should not penalise or avenge customers who choose to use software from those providers on cloud offers from other providers, for example by performing higher or intrusive software audits or by imposing licensing costs

Software providers should not penalise or avenge customers who choose to use software from such providers on cloud offers from other providers, for example by performing higher or intrusive software audits or imposing higher software licensing costs. Avoid customer lock-in via interoperable directory software: directory software that allows companies to create, identify, manage and authenticate users and allows authorized users to access a wide variety of applications, systems and others Software providers providing directory software have a greater responsibility to ensure that such directories support open standards for synchronization and authentication of user identities in a non-discriminatory manner with other identity services and do not prevent customers from switching from a provider

directory software that allows companies to create, identify, manage and authenticate users and allows authorized users to access a wide variety of applications, systems and other resources is crucial to the way in which these companies operate a computer environment. Software providers providing directory software have a greater responsibility to ensure that such directories support open standards for synchronization and authentication of user identities in a non-discriminatory manner with other identity services and do not prevent customers from switching from a provider Equal treatment for software license fees in the cloud: Software providers should not charge different prices for the same software based solely on those who own the hardware on which it is installed. Software prices should not discriminate between software installed in a customer’s data center, in a third-party data center, on computers rented by third parties or in the cloud, unless costs differ depending on where it is installed.

Software providers should not charge different prices for the same software solely on the basis of those who own the hardware on which it is installed. Software prices should not discriminate between software installed in a customer’s, in a third-party data center, on computers rented by third parties or in the cloud, unless costs differ depending on where it is installed. Permitted uses of the software should be reliable and predictable. Software providers must not make substantial changes to the licensing conditions that limit customers to previously permitted uses, in particular when customers may have relied on such uses, unless required by law or due to security issues.

Software providers must not make substantial changes to the licensing conditions that limit customers to previously permitted uses, in particular when customers may have relied on such uses, unless required by law or due to security issues. The licences should cover the reasonably planned uses of the software. Software providers should not deceive customers by selling licenses that customers reasonably expect should cover the use of the software expected, but in reality require the purchase of additional licenses, especially if such additional uses are those recommended by the software provider.

Software providers should not deceive customers by selling licenses that customers reasonably expect should cover the use of the software expected, but in reality require the purchase of additional licenses, especially if such additional uses are those recommended by the software provider. Allowing fair software transfers: where customers have the right to resell and transfer software licenses, software providers should continue to offer support and patches on fair terms to customers who have legally acquired a resale license. Refusing to support customers who have properly acquired license rights unfairly degrades the value and usefulness of the software and exposes licensees to security threats due to patchless vulnerabilities.

Associations supporting the Ten Principles

CIO AICA Forum

The IOC AICA Forum is a Working Group promoted by AICA exclusively reserved and dedicated to those who are in charge of the functions of Chief Information Officer (CIO) in large or medium-sized organizations. CIO AICA Forum is, in particular, the Italian group that joins the European CIO Association (formerly EuroCIO), the European Association of CIOs, with the aim of ensuring a stable relationship between the Italian and European CIOs. The Forum is absolutely independent from suppliers. Its operation is defined by a specific Regulation established by the Associates. The main aim is to establish an area of exchange of experience, on common issues of function and role, representing the Italian IOCs both in similar international organizations and in relation to institutional partners (ministers, authorities) and sector (suppliers, consultants). The aim is to anticipate the development of common emerging problems, which are inherent in the role played both personally and in the organisations for which the IOCs operate and to define a common line on issues that are most important to the IOCs.

CISPE

CISPE is the association of cloud infrastructure service providers in Europe, which has 34 members and global fora in 14 EU Member States. The association has developed the first GDPR code of conduct that encourages the storage and processing of personal data exclusively in Europe. Since 2017, with EuroCIO and then with CIGREF, CISPE has co-chaired the working group that develops codes of conduct that facilitate and allow data portability, established by the European Commission under the EU Regulation on free flow of non-personal data. In addition, CISPE is one of the 22 founding members of the Gaia-X initiative and one of the Climate Neutral Data Centre Pact’s convokes.

AUSED is an Association between Systems and Information Technologies, independent and non-profit, founded in 1976; it collects companies operating in the fields: industrial, manufacturing, services, as well as some public bodies. The activities of AUSED are carried out with the organization of meetings, seminars, courses, study groups, surveys etc., which are characterized, as well as by high professionalism, by extreme concreteness as they are constantly aimed at solving problems of choice, development and management of In

CIO Club Italia is born from the desire of professionals working in the field of Information Technology to create a free association between those who want to share knowledge, to confront themselves for work or passion, in the management of IT departments, especially in the Italian SMEs. The characteristic of CIO Club Italia is the desire to innovate and create a network to which reference in every aspect of its professional growth.

FIDAInform is the National Federation of Professional Associations of Information Management, the Clubs, developed spontaneously since 1984 in different Italian regions, that is associations of professionals of the ICT (Information and Communications Technology) that participate in it at a personal and non-company level The Clubs and the Federation are proposed as active “nodo” of the Country-System for the development of the Information and Communication Technology Sector, promoting the professionalism of the Members.

CIONET is an international business community of CIO & Digital Leader of Top and Middle-Great companies in Europe, America and Australia. CIONET has been present in Italy since 2010. As a high-profile business community, CIONET focuses on the themes of IT, Innovation and Digital Transformation. CIONET is operating in an international context and ensures its members a dedicated, specialized and exclusive environment, suitable for building relationships, sharing experiences and ideas, to play the challenge of What’s next.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You May Also Like